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currentsinbiology:

Fibroblast
Dr. Jan Schmoranzer
New York, NY, USA
Technique: Fluorescence

currentsinbiology:

Fibroblast

Dr. Jan Schmoranzer

New York, NY, USA

Technique: Fluorescence

— 9 months ago with 66 notes
currentsinbiology:

Spray drying is a commonly used technique in the pharmaceutical industry to control the particle size and distribution of powders. It typically results in shrunken and partly collapsed particles. This is due to the initial formation of a dry shell around a sphere of wet material. As the residual moisture diffuses and evaporates, the shell collapses. This image shows a small molecule compound that was spray dried to enhance its solubility, (theguardian)

currentsinbiology:

Spray drying is a commonly used technique in the pharmaceutical industry to control the particle size and distribution of powders. It typically results in shrunken and partly collapsed particles. This is due to the initial formation of a dry shell around a sphere of wet material. As the residual moisture diffuses and evaporates, the shell collapses. This image shows a small molecule compound that was spray dried to enhance its solubility, (theguardian)

— 10 months ago with 81 notes

jtotheizzoe:

I’m Pollen For You

It’s a lot prettier when it’s on paper rather than launching your sinuses into full revolt and unleashing a Niagara Falls-level torrent of snotty discomfort, eh?

Pollen is strange stuff.  Although many pollen grains are only a few millionths of a meter across, plants sculpt remarkably intricate and diverse suits of armor for these mobile gametes, having evolved a remarkable variation of symmetries.

To deliver a plant’s male genetic material to female plant parts, it’s got to be both sticky and tough. Within the pollen grain, a dormant cell lies poised for division, ready to burrow a pollen tube toward the seed ovum when it finds the right female parts. Surrounding that hibernating genetic material are two layers of protection: cellulose-rich intine and sporopollenin-sculpted exine.

So tough are those outer layers, so effectively do they protect the cells within, that pollen grains can be used to study everything from crime scenes to ancient climates. The spores below have survived more than 400 million years, dating from a time when plants had just invaded land and begun to reach up toward the sun:

Illustrations up top are from Ueber de Pollen, by Carl Julius Fritzsche (1837). If you speak German, there’s more small wonder for you here.

(via Public Domain Review)

— 10 months ago with 466 notes
ucresearch:

Microbial Dark Matter
Is space really the final frontier or are the greatest mysteries closer to home? Researchers estimate that there are more undiscovered microbes on earth than stars in the sky.  These microbes are known as “microbial dark matter” and form the pervasive (yet practically invisible) infrastructure of life on the planet.

A single handful of dirt contains approximately 100 billion microbes, but we have only been able to access the genomes of a few thousand of them.  One large problem is that many microbes are unable to grow outside of their natural environment.  

Researchers at the Joint Genome Institute are try to fill in these gaps of knowledge through new identification techniques (single-cell genomics).
Watch the video →

ucresearch:

Microbial Dark Matter


Is space really the final frontier or are the greatest mysteries closer to home? Researchers estimate that there are more undiscovered microbes on earth than stars in the sky.  These microbes are known as “microbial dark matter” and form the pervasive (yet practically invisible) infrastructure of life on the planet.

A single handful of dirt contains approximately 100 billion microbes, but we have only been able to access the genomes of a few thousand of them.  One large problem is that many microbes are unable to grow outside of their natural environment.  

Researchers at the Joint Genome Institute are try to fill in these gaps of knowledge through new identification techniques (single-cell genomics).

Watch the video →

— 10 months ago with 328 notes
currentsinbiology:

Polymers That React and Move to Light
Microvehicles and other devices that can change shape or move with no power source other than a beam of light may be possible through research led by the University of Pittsburgh. The researchers are investigating polymers that “snap” when triggered by light, thereby converting light energy into mechanical work and potentially eliminating the need for traditional machine components such as switches and power sources.
M. R. Shankar, M. L. Smith, V. P. Tondiglia, K. M. Lee, M. E. McConney, D. H. Wang, L.-S. Tan, T. J. White. Contactless, photoinitiated snap-through in azobenzene-functionalized polymers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1313195110

currentsinbiology:

Polymers That React and Move to Light

Microvehicles and other devices that can change shape or move with no power source other than a beam of light may be possible through research led by the University of Pittsburgh. The researchers are investigating polymers that “snap” when triggered by light, thereby converting light energy into mechanical work and potentially eliminating the need for traditional machine components such as switches and power sources.

M. R. Shankar, M. L. Smith, V. P. Tondiglia, K. M. Lee, M. E. McConney, D. H. Wang, L.-S. Tan, T. J. White. Contactless, photoinitiated snap-through in azobenzene-functionalized polymers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1313195110

— 10 months ago with 102 notes
currentsinbiology:

Fibroblast Cells Sealing Wound
Dr. Jan Schmoranzer
Columbia University
New York, NY, USA
Technique: Confocal

currentsinbiology:

Fibroblast Cells Sealing Wound

Dr. Jan Schmoranzer

Columbia University

New York, NY, USA

Technique: Confocal

— 10 months ago with 102 notes
post-mitotic:

this image of a hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory inputs (purple; synaptic boutons) is the fifth place winner of the 2013 Nikon Small World Competition, released just today
head over to see the other winners
confocal (63x)
credit: Kieran Boyle

post-mitotic:

this image of a hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory inputs (purple; synaptic boutons) is the fifth place winner of the 2013 Nikon Small World Competition, released just today

head over to see the other winners

confocal (63x)

credit: Kieran Boyle

— 10 months ago with 500 notes
bpod-mrc:

22 October 2013
Colourful Reconstruction
The brain has an amazing ability to repair itself after injuries such as those caused by a stroke, but little is known about how this happens. Astrocytes – the support cells of the nervous system – provide nutrients and structural support for nerve cells and are thought to play a large role in injury repair. The challenge is to find out what astrocytes get up to after an injury. Here fluorescent proteins highlight varieties of astrocytes in different colours – the many coloured astrocytes are surrounding a dark spot where an injury has occurred. Different types of astrocytes have distinct responses to brain injury. One group, coloured turquoise, has grown in the direction of the cut to form a natural webbing helping to repair the damage. Investigations into how the nervous system repairs itself may lead to new therapies and treatments encouraging natural nervous system repair in brain injury patients.
Written by Mary-Clare Hallsworth
—
Laura López-Mascaraque Instituto Cajal, CSIC, Madrid, Spain  Originally published under a Creative Commons Attribution license Published in PLoS ONE 8(9): e74039

bpod-mrc:

22 October 2013

Colourful Reconstruction

The brain has an amazing ability to repair itself after injuries such as those caused by a stroke, but little is known about how this happens. Astrocytes – the support cells of the nervous system – provide nutrients and structural support for nerve cells and are thought to play a large role in injury repair. The challenge is to find out what astrocytes get up to after an injury. Here fluorescent proteins highlight varieties of astrocytes in different colours – the many coloured astrocytes are surrounding a dark spot where an injury has occurred. Different types of astrocytes have distinct responses to brain injury. One group, coloured turquoise, has grown in the direction of the cut to form a natural webbing helping to repair the damage. Investigations into how the nervous system repairs itself may lead to new therapies and treatments encouraging natural nervous system repair in brain injury patients.

Written by Mary-Clare Hallsworth

Laura López-Mascaraque
Instituto Cajal, CSIC, Madrid, Spain
Originally published under a Creative Commons Attribution license
Published in PLoS ONE 8(9): e74039

— 11 months ago with 177 notes
mucholderthen:

Mendel’s Dream Arabidopsis flower captured with confocal microscopy Microphotography [20x] by Heiti PavesKeskkonnamuutustele kohanemise tippkeskus ENVIRON[Centre of Excellence in Environmental Adaptation ENVIRON] (Estonia)

Although frequently overshadowed by creatures that think and move, plants have been at the forefront of molecular and cellular biology since their inception.
Think micro RNAs, transposons, active demethylation, ‘decoy’ RNAs, and—oh yeah—a few findings by an Austrian friar.
ImageArabidopsis flower captured with confocal microscopy using a 20x objective lens. The membrane is stained red with dye FM4-64FX, and DNA is stained blue with Hoechst 33342.
Source: Cell.

mucholderthen:

Mendel’s Dream
Arabidopsis flower captured with confocal microscopy 
Microphotography [20x] by Heiti Paves
Keskkonnamuutustele kohanemise tippkeskus ENVIRON
[Centre of Excellence in Environmental Adaptation ENVIRON] (Estonia)

Although frequently overshadowed by creatures that think and move,
plants have been at the forefront of molecular and cellular biology
since their inception.

Think micro RNAs, transposons, active demethylation, ‘decoy’ RNAs, and—oh yeah—a few findings by an Austrian friar.

Image
Arabidopsis flower captured with confocal microscopy using a 20x objective lens. The membrane is stained red with dye FM4-64FX, and DNA is stained blue with Hoechst 33342.

Source: Cell.

— 11 months ago with 314 notes
wildcat2030:

Researchers rewrite an entire genome — and add a healthy twist
Scientists from Yale and Harvard have recoded the entire genome of an organism and improved a bacterium’s ability to resist viruses, a dramatic demonstration of the potential of rewriting an organism’s genetic code. “This is the first time the genetic code has been fundamentally changed,” said Farren Isaacs, assistant professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at Yale and co-senior author of the research published Oct. 18 in the journal Science. “Creating an organism with a new genetic code has allowed us to expand the scope of biological function in a number of powerful ways.” The creation of a genomically recoded organism raises the possibility that researchers might be able to retool nature and create potent new forms of proteins to accomplish a myriad purposes — from combating disease to generating new classes of materials. The research — headed by Isaacs and co-author George Church of Harvard Medical School — is a product of years of studies in the emerging field of synthetic biology, which seeks to re-design natural biological systems for useful purposes. In this case, the researchers changed fundamental rules of biology. (via YaleNews | Researchers rewrite an entire genome — and add a healthy twist)

wildcat2030:

Researchers rewrite an entire genome — and add a healthy twist

Scientists from Yale and Harvard have recoded the entire genome of an organism and improved a bacterium’s ability to resist viruses, a dramatic demonstration of the potential of rewriting an organism’s genetic code. “This is the first time the genetic code has been fundamentally changed,” said Farren Isaacs, assistant professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at Yale and co-senior author of the research published Oct. 18 in the journal Science. “Creating an organism with a new genetic code has allowed us to expand the scope of biological function in a number of powerful ways.” The creation of a genomically recoded organism raises the possibility that researchers might be able to retool nature and create potent new forms of proteins to accomplish a myriad purposes — from combating disease to generating new classes of materials. The research — headed by Isaacs and co-author George Church of Harvard Medical School — is a product of years of studies in the emerging field of synthetic biology, which seeks to re-design natural biological systems for useful purposes. In this case, the researchers changed fundamental rules of biology. (via YaleNews | Researchers rewrite an entire genome — and add a healthy twist)

— 11 months ago with 189 notes

wetwareontologies:

 ”The ribosome is, in fact, a nano-scale computer and is very much analogous to the ‘CPU’ of the cell,” he said.

A supercomputer simulation of the ribosome dating back to 2005. It simulates 2.64 million atoms in motion. The in motion is key as the molecular machinery of a ribosome can only be comprehended when its relation to the motion of the cellular environment and how it utilises motion in manufacturing peptides can be considered.

Kevin Sanbonmatsu of Los Alamos National Laboratory ran the simulation on 768 of the “Q” machine’s 8,192 available processors. The entire project took 6 months of work: the end animation equates to 20 nanoseconds of simulated ribosome machinations

[link]

— 11 months ago with 262 notes

sci-universe:

Award-winning images of life science specimens captured through microscopes.
Click images to see captions & authors.

— 11 months ago with 1892 notes
currentsinbiology:



Mr. Thomas Deerinck
University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA, USA Specimen: Rodent Eye Arteries Technique: Confocal

currentsinbiology:

Mr. Thomas Deerinck

University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, CA, USA
Specimen: Rodent Eye Arteries
Technique: Confocal

— 11 months ago with 156 notes
bpod-mrc:

18 October 2013
Drug Smuggler
Some naturally occurring proteins interact with medicines in surprising ways. A protein called P-gp, for example, sits on the cell surface and shuttles a broad range of drugs out wards. It plays a role in multidrug resistance in cancer – if it becomes abundant the cancer cells can eliminate not only the current medicine, but a host of others too, leaving the patient with few options. Scientists studying asthma are also interested in this protein because it could influence the absorption of medicines taken by inhaler. Pictured is a human airway surrounded by epithelial cells (green) with P-gp highlighted in red. Asthma medicines are often only required at the lung surface and some produce side effects elsewhere in the body. So P-gp might act as a natural barrier preventing drugs from crossing into the blood supply. A better understanding of this protein’s role is important for the development of new medicines.
Written by Julie Webb
—
Image by Holly Brooker, an entrant in the Society of Biology 2012 Photography competition Part of the Society of Biology’s ‘Biology Week’ Image provided by the Society of Biology Research published in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, September 2013

bpod-mrc:

18 October 2013

Drug Smuggler

Some naturally occurring proteins interact with medicines in surprising ways. A protein called P-gp, for example, sits on the cell surface and shuttles a broad range of drugs out wards. It plays a role in multidrug resistance in cancer – if it becomes abundant the cancer cells can eliminate not only the current medicine, but a host of others too, leaving the patient with few options. Scientists studying asthma are also interested in this protein because it could influence the absorption of medicines taken by inhaler. Pictured is a human airway surrounded by epithelial cells (green) with P-gp highlighted in red. Asthma medicines are often only required at the lung surface and some produce side effects elsewhere in the body. So P-gp might act as a natural barrier preventing drugs from crossing into the blood supply. A better understanding of this protein’s role is important for the development of new medicines.

Written by Julie Webb

Image by Holly Brooker, an entrant in the Society of Biology 2012 Photography competition
Part of the Society of Biology’s ‘Biology Week’
Image provided by the Society of Biology
Research published in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, September 2013

— 11 months ago with 148 notes